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Maxime Brami

Maxime Brami

This blog is being administered by Dr Maxime Brami, PI of the Project 'ODYSSEA', hosted by the Palaeogenetics Group, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No 793893
Tags associés : publications

Ses blogs

Prehistoric Migrations

Prehistoric Migrations

A blog dedicated to Neolithic and Bronze Age migrations in Europe
Maxime Brami Maxime Brami
Articles : 19
Depuis : 30/04/2020

Articles à découvrir

Seminar in Helsinki

Seminar in Helsinki

- Helsinki 160120_compressed.pdf Organised by the Faculty of Arts, Archaeology, FIBULA and ERC Project YMPACT, Helsinki – Ex Oriente Lux. Early agricultural expansions beyond the Near East
Archaeology in Anatolia Symposium, London

Archaeology in Anatolia Symposium, London

Dr Maxime Brami presentation - Early farming expansion beyond the Anatolian plateau on the occasion of the Anglo-Turkish Society / RAI / SOAS / BIAA joint Sy...
Prehistoric Mobility Workshop **Cancelled until further notice**

Prehistoric Mobility Workshop **Cancelled until further notice**

Science in Archaeology Seminar Series, Kickoff Workshop 'Prehistoric Mobility', Hosted by the Palaeogenetics Group, AG Burger Organized with Aldo Malagó and Antoine Muller **Cancelled until further notice due to the Covid-19 outbreak, stay tuned for update**
Interview by Craig Encer, Anglo-Turkish Society

Interview by Craig Encer, Anglo-Turkish Society

Anglo-Turkish Society / RAI / SOAS / BIAA joint Symposium: 'Archaeology in Anatolia' with the opening address given by Professor Ian Hodder - flyer - poster - programme: 1- What was the title of ... 1- What was the title of your phd and did your higher education in British Universities open new doors for you? My PhD, which I defended in 2014 at the
The Central/Western Anatolian Farming Frontier

The Central/Western Anatolian Farming Frontier

The transformation of societies from mobile hunter-gatherers into farming communities living in permanent villages represents one of the most essential revolutions in Proceedings of the Neolithic Workshop held at 10th ICAANE in Vienna, April 2016 The adoption of agriculture and settled village life is one of the most important transitions in prehis
New research posted on BioRxiv

New research posted on BioRxiv

New research by my colleagues Nina Marchi, Laurent Excoffier, Joachim Burger, Daniel Wegmann and many others now available on BioRxiv. While the Neolithic expansion in Europe is well described archaeologically, the genetic origins of European first farmers and their affinities with local hunter-gatherers (HGs) remain unclear. To ... The mixed genet
Seminar in Barcelona

Seminar in Barcelona

The 1st Conference on the Early Neolithic of Europe is over. It has been three intense days in which we have been able to contrast methodologies, share data and discuss from different perspectives ... ENE 2019 1st Conference on the Early Neolithic of Europe, Barcelona Early Farmer mobility: how to (and not to) integrate archaeology and genetics In
Anatolia: From the Origins of Agriculture … to the Spread of Neolithic Economies

Anatolia: From the Origins of Agriculture … to the Spread of Neolithic Economies

Brami M.N. (2019), ‘Anatolia. From the origins of agriculture… to the spread of Neolithic economies’. In: M. Brami and B. Horejs (eds), The Central/Western Anatolian Farming Frontier. Vienna: Austrian Academy of Sciences Press, 17-44. The spread of farming in Europe is usually thought of as a straightforward case of diffusion from a centre, o
Revisiting V. Gordon Childe's 'Neolithic Revolution'

Revisiting V. Gordon Childe's 'Neolithic Revolution'

This article re-examines the 'neolithic revolution'-Gordon Childe's great contribution to prehistoric archaeology. Childe first articulated his model of three revolutions in history-neolithic, urban The Invention of Prehistory and the Rediscovery of Europe: Exploring the Intellectual Roots of Gordon Childe’s ‘Neolithic Revolution’ (1936) Abst